Demoralization


This post is essentially an interim reference list. Demoralization is arguably the most important concept in suicidality that you’ve never heard of.

Demoralization and remoralization: a review of these constructs in the healthcare literature Margaret J Connor, Jo Ann Walton

Nursing Inquiry

Nursing Inquiry

Volume 18, Issue 1, pages 2–11, March 2011

The Social Separation Syndrome
Reprinted from Survival International Review Vol. 5, No. 1(29):13-15, 1980.
G. N. Appell
Brandeis University

Engel and his collaborators have been concerned with the related question: Why do people fall ill or die at the time they do? And they have identified a psychological pattern that appears associated with disease

onset that they call the Agiving up–given up complex@. Five characteristics are identified with this complex (Engel 1968): (1) the giving up affects, i.e. helplessness or hopelessness; (2) a depreciated image of the self; (3) a loss of gratification from relationships or roles in life; (4) a disruption of the sense of continuity between past, present, and future; and (5) a reactivation of memories of earlier periods of giving up.

Pubmed search for demoralization

The term demoralization was first used in the psychiatric literature by Jerome Frank in the 1970s (i.e., “the chief problem of all patients who come to psychotherapy is demoralization . . . the effectiveness of all psychotherapeutic schools lies in their ability to restore patient morale”)1(p271) and represented a persistent failure of coping with (internally or externally induced) stress; Frank believed demoralization left one feeling impotent, isolated, and in despair. This conceptualization was congruent with the psychodynamic approach of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Second Edition (DSM-II),2 in which all disorders were considered reactions to environmental events. Frank defined the symptoms of anxiety and depression as direct expressions of demoralization.1
However, in 1975, Schildkraut and Klein3 defined demoralization as a state separate from depression. Whereas patients with depression experienced anhedonia, patients with demoralization lost their sense of efficacy. In the 1980s and 1990s, Frank and De Figueiredo further refined the meaning of demoralization.4 The term demoralization remained distinct from depression and was characterized by 2 states: distress and a sense of incompetence that results from an uncertainty about which direction to take. Individuals with depression and those with anhedonia cannot act (even if they know the proper direction to take).
Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2010 Jun;12(3):229-33.

Differentiation between demoralization, grief, and anhedonic depression.

Source

Department of Veterans Affairs, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, 4300 West 7th Street, 116T/LR, Little Rock, AR 72205-5484, USA. marcus.wellen@va.gov

Abstract

Demoralization is a phenomenon in which a patient reaches a state of subjective incompetence, hopelessness, and helplessness that can lead to that devastating moment in which he or she feels the only recourse left is to give up. This article reviews the medical literature regarding the current understanding, importance, and impact of demoralization. In addition, using the key characteristics of demoralization, this article attempts to compare and contrast demoralization with anhedonia and grief.

 

TO THE EDITOR: Dr. Slavney’s stimulating article, “DiagnosingDemoralization in Consultation Psychiatry,” is a valuable additionto the ongoing debate on demoralization.1 Dr. Slavney statesthat demoralization is a normal response to adversity and thathe disagrees with my proposal to substitute “demoralization”for “severity of psychosocial stressors” as Axis IV in the DSM.Although demoralization may, at times, be understandable, asin the cases described by Dr. Slavney, the view I proposed isthat demoralization is always abnormal. It is because demoralizationis abnormal that it requires treatment (psychotherapy). I proposedthat demoralization be conceptualized as involving two states:distress (which some other authors have called “demoralization,”incorrectly in my opinion) and subjective incompetence. Althougheach of these two states may be normal by itself, their overlapwould constitute demoralization, which is always abnormal. Demoralizationis thus viewed as a boundary phenomenon, that is, a state thatoccurs within the individual and at the boundary with the environment,something akin to inflammation.

World Psychiatry. 2005 June; 4(2): 96–105.
PMCID: PMC1414748
Copyright World Psychiatric Association
DAVID M. CLARKE,1 DAVID W. KISSANE,1 TOM TRAUER,1 and GRAEME C. SMITH1
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