Emotions and Social Behavior


Well, so much for keeping up with blogging.  An unexpected health insult, weeks of bedrest and sequelae of fatigue and brain fog haven’t done me any favors. But whatever, here’s a bit of catch up, even if presented through a dense fog….

Kipling Williams is one of the few researchers who is investigating ostracism.  I want to read his major opus, Ostracism: The Power of Silence, but will have to wait until I can do so in library residence, as it doesn’t circulate. (If you have a copy to lend or re-sell at a bargain, I’d be thrilled.)  The library has it catalogued under social isolation, and in a collection titled emotions and social behavior.

The latter label struck a chord, for what is suicidality but distress signaling (the emotion) which if unaddressed, leads to suicidal attempts (the social behavior)?

So when I start thinking more clearly again, I’ll try to put together some sort of framework for addressing the distress signaling:

  • alienation
  • burdensomeness (perceived)
  • demoralization
  • despair
  • grief (situational)
  • guilt
  • helplessness
  • hopelessness
  • ostracism (externally applied isolation)
  • pessimism
  • powerlessness
  • realism
  • self identity loss – externally removed (loss/denial of social roles)
  • self loathing
  • shame
  • social isolation (as opposed to voluntary avoidance and isolating behavior)
  • thwarted belongingness
  • worthlessness (perceived and externally applied)

To date, no one has studied people who have made suicide attempts or completed suicides to evaluate what behaviors they used to try to adapt to the distressors, what train of events (thoughts, feelings and behaviors) they experienced when the distress wasn’t adequately relieved, and what directly led to the suicidal ideation, the suicidal attempt, and the completed suicides. But at certainly needs must be done in order to treat suicidality upstream – preferably before the suicidality is entertained and certainly before it is acted upon.

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