Emotions and Social Behavior

Well, so much for keeping up with blogging.  An unexpected health insult, weeks of bedrest and sequelae of fatigue and brain fog haven’t done me any favors. But whatever, here’s a bit of catch up, even if presented through a dense fog….

Kipling Williams is one of the few researchers who is investigating ostracism.  I want to read his major opus, Ostracism: The Power of Silence, but will have to wait until I can do so in library residence, as it doesn’t circulate. (If you have a copy to lend or re-sell at a bargain, I’d be thrilled.)  The library has it catalogued under social isolation, and in a collection titled emotions and social behavior.

The latter label struck a chord, for what is suicidality but distress signaling (the emotion) which if unaddressed, leads to suicidal attempts (the social behavior)?

So when I start thinking more clearly again, I’ll try to put together some sort of framework for addressing the distress signaling:

  • alienation
  • burdensomeness (perceived)
  • demoralization
  • despair
  • grief (situational)
  • guilt
  • helplessness
  • hopelessness
  • ostracism (externally applied isolation)
  • pessimism
  • powerlessness
  • realism
  • self identity loss – externally removed (loss/denial of social roles)
  • self loathing
  • shame
  • social isolation (as opposed to voluntary avoidance and isolating behavior)
  • thwarted belongingness
  • worthlessness (perceived and externally applied)

To date, no one has studied people who have made suicide attempts or completed suicides to evaluate what behaviors they used to try to adapt to the distressors, what train of events (thoughts, feelings and behaviors) they experienced when the distress wasn’t adequately relieved, and what directly led to the suicidal ideation, the suicidal attempt, and the completed suicides. But at certainly needs must be done in order to treat suicidality upstream – preferably before the suicidality is entertained and certainly before it is acted upon.

Advertisements

What Protects?

I’m working a bit sideways and backwards since I haven’t developed a more comprehensive explanation of suicidality prompts.  But there have been several studies in the news which address compensatory mechanisms and adaptation, so the time’s right to get them out there for people to consider.

To experience external physical warmth which approximates human or possibly mammalian warmth is a basic human need. It turns out that when lonely college students were queried on bathing behaviors, those reporting higher degrees of loneliness had significantly different habits.  They bathed/showered more frequently, for longer periods of time and they used warmer water temperatures.  The authors postulate that this is a self-soothing strategy which serves as a rough proxy for human warmth.

The Ohio State University published a study demonstrating an association between particulate pollution and clinical depression.  Given the inflammatory involvement in depression, these finding serve as more fuel for this fire.  It might be worth trying room-based air filters to see if people get any anti-inflammatory effects. More research needs to be done in essential quality of life factors.

The website, Ostracism Aware, has a resource listing which seems to be fairly comprehensive.

What do you find helps to relieve the feelings of isolation, loneliness, not belonging, depression or being a burden? What doesn’t help?  What do other people do that helps?  And what do other people do that makes things worse?